– Highlights

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Mca Collection

MCA Collection: Today Tomorrow Yesterday

01 Sep - 31 Dec

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Exhibition

The National 2017

30 Mar - 18 Jun

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Exhibition

Kader Attia

12 Apr - 30 Jul

– Learning Events

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Special Event

ARTBAR March 2017

31 Mar, 7.00pm, MCA

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Conference

Educators conference: 6-7 April

06 Apr, 6.00pm, Level 3: National Centre for Creative Learning

– News from inside the MCA

Art Escapades

Artist Educator Nicole Barakat talks about our new Art Escapades program for 3-5 year olds. more

Support Australian Design this International Women's Day

To celebrate International Women’s Day we’re shining the spotlight on a selection of talented independent, Australia women artists and designers currently stocked at MCA Store more

From the archives: February

Looking forward, looking back. This new monthly series explores MCA archives, penned by our very own Archives and Records Management Coordinator, Stephanie Ferrara. more

– Spotlights from the collection online

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MCA Collection

Works from the MCA Collection

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Collection Artist Interviews

Watch our latest interviews in the MCA Video Portal

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Joint acquisitions by MCA and Tate

The Program promotes Australian art globally, helping Australian artists reach new audiences.

Jean Baudrillard: The Ecstasy of Photography

Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA)

Duration

04 May 1994 to 20 May 1994

Guest Curator: Nicholas Zurbrugg

About the exhibition

Jean Baudrillard was internationally recognised as one of the world’s leading intellectuals. Born in 1929 in France, he rose to prominence as a philosopher, sociologist, cultural theorist and political commentator in the 1980s and 90s. His published works were considered part of the poststructuralist philosophical school, along with the works of Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Derrida. Baudrillard died in 2007.

In 1981, Baudrillard began to explore photography, using his art to further express his philosophical ideas. He saw photography as a means to capture a world that existed in paradox from reality – a ‘radically non-objective’ world.